Black ‘race’ and the White Supremacy Saga

Black ‘race’ and the White Supremacy Saga

By Kehbuma Langmia

This book examines the conundrum that has haunted the Black and White ancestry for ages on what supremacy actually means. Is it Black or White supremacy? Granted, the term White supremacy has occupied the sociopolitical, cultural and economic discourse for ages, but what does that really imply? This book debates that concept.

Hardback, 208 Pages

ISBN:9781839989964

February 2024

£80.00, $110.00

  • About This Book
  • Reviews
  • Author Information
  • Series
  • Table of Contents
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  • Podcasts

About This Book

This book examines the conundrum that has haunted the Black and White ancestry for ages on what supremacy actually means. Is it Black or White supremacy? Granted, the term White supremacy has occupied the sociopolitical, cultural and economic discourse for ages, but what does that really imply? All other ancestries on planet earth have been coerced to believe that conformity to Euro-American lifestyle is the way to become ‘civilized’ on planet earth. But the term civilization owes its genesis to the African cultural and educational achievements in Egypt. Consequently, Black ancestry, the first human specie on planet earth, should lead mankind to cultural and epistemological supremacy but that has always been met with skepticism.This book examines this debate, especially between the Black and the White ancestry.

There appears to be a pejorative connotation associated with the term Black. It has been ‘inferiorized’ because of the stain of slavery, servitude and brutal murders suffered by those from the continent of Africa that are overwhelmingly Black. The European slave trade, Arab slave trade, colonization and neo-colonization dealt irreparable blow to the people of Africa and have subordinated, and worse of all relegated, the Black person to the lowliest rung of all races on planet earth. But other races like the Jews suffered slavery from Nazi Germany. According to the Global slavery index in 2018, Asian regions of North Korea, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Cambodiaand so onhave experienced different forms of modern as well as non-modern slavery. European invaders of North America slaughtered millions of Native Indian tribes who were the original inhabitants and relegated them to the periphery. Between 1530 and 1780, Davis (2003) confirms that Europeans were enslaved by Muslims in North Africa. So why has that of the Black person been so pronounced? Cheikh Anta Diop simplifies the reason for this attitude towards the Black ancestry in his book The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality by ascribing it to ignorance of these group of people and their African continent:

Reviews

“Kehbuma Langmia undertakes a historical intellectual trip that includes understanding the Black race, rendered inferior globally through its enslavement and the centuries-long auctioning of its human and socioeconomic capital. Langmia’s provocative discourse titled Black ‘Race’ and the Supremacy Sagais a must-read in our high-speed world fraught with racial tensions.” —Prof Emmanuel K. Ngwainmbi, UNESCO Fellow, Editor, Dismantling Cultural Borders through Social Media and Digital Communications and Former Chair, Department of Mass Communication, Jackson State University, Mississippi, USA.

“I believe that this book by Langmia represents an accurate response to the irrational, a thrust of exhaustive energy toward the negativity of biological race, and an attempt to bring the reader close to the ship of culture, sailing in the traditional values of the oft-forgotten history of the great African family.” —Molefi Kete Asante, Temple University, USA.

“In this poignant treatise, Kehbuma Langmia investigates the contemporary notion of race and how it continues to shape the social-cultural realities of the African world. Langmia presents new conceptual language to challenge the hegemony of Western epistemology and how such is driven by the power of racial classification that erroneously juxtaposes ‘White’ as superior and ‘Black’ as inferior.” —Taharka Adé, author of W.E.B. Du Bois’ Africa: Scrambling for a New Africa and Assistant Professor, Africana Studies, San Diego State University, USA.

Author Information

Kehbuma Langmia is a full professor and a Fulbright scholar in the Cathy Hughes School of Communications, Howard University, Washington DC. He has published nationally and internationally on media communications.

Series

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Table of Contents

Foreword; Acknowledgments; 1 The Shifting Sands on the Feet of Black People; 2 Shadow of Colonialism and Slavery on Black People; 3 Black People and COVID-19; 4 Africans and Mass Immigration; 5 Blacks and the Politics of Demo-“Crazy” and Development; 6 Victimhood and the Identity Crisis: Blacks and the Epistemology of Freedom; 7 Black Status and Physical Threats; 8 The Epistemology of Black Poverty, Resistance, and Resilience; 9 The Politics of Europe/China Dependency on Africa; 10 False Western Epistemological Dominance; References; Index

Links

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